Homemade all-natural hand sanitizer (Dettol alternative)

Antibacterial soaps and hand sanitizers have boomed over the last decade, and ironically enough this has introduced a number of new health concerns.  That being said, keeping good hand hygiene (washing your hands with good old soap and water) is essential to stay healthy. Because I don’t always have access to soap and water when I travel here in India, I have learned to make my own hand sanitizer from all-natural ingredients, that I would like to share with you. But first a little background.

The antibacterial scam

While we are being bombarded with commercials, stating that antibacterial products are more effective than regular soap and water, the reality is more complex. Many antibacterial agents added in commercial products are strong chemicals that do more damage to our health than it prevents. Additionally, tests have shown no evidence they do a better job at cleaning your hands. If you want to read more on this topic, you can start by reading The dangers of antibacterial soap (Dettol).

It’s also important to understand that not all bacteria is bad – actually, we need them to stay healthy! We even need to be exposed to ‘bad’ bacteria to help build up our immune system, which usually happens as we grow up. Though the same process continues every time we get exposed to a new environment. My point is this: don’t take commercial companies on their word. Understand the science, and make an informed decision. I’ve concluded that the best option is natural soap, water, and homemade hand sanitizer.

The Ingredients

Rubbing alcohol – a strong antibacterial agent, often used for disinfecting and sterilizing. It can be left out of the recipe, for a milder hand sanitizer.

Aloe Vera gel – a nourishing gel, that is mild on the skin. It can help treat small rashes and skin irritations.

Essential oil – a selection of EO’s with antibacterial properties – choose between tea tree, cinnamon, Oregano, Thyme, Eucalyptus, Lavender, Lemongrass and Bergamot, Clove.

(Optional) Glycerin – a moisturizing liquid, known for its ability to ‘attract’ moisture from the air. Rubbing alcohol can be drying, and this is to counter that.

The Recipe

Note: the recipe is not adjusted to children. Do research child safe essential oils, to adjust accordingly.

  • 1 tbs Rubbing Alcohol
  • 5 tbsp Aloe Vera Gel
  • 20 drops Essential Oils of choice
  • 1/2 tsp Glycerin

Simply mix the ingredients in a bowl and stir for a few minutes. Keep it in an airtight container. I have re-used an old squeeze bottle, which fits conveniently in my hand bag.

This was all for now. Let me know if you have any questions or comments below. I’d be happy to hear your favorite recipe for homemade hand sanitizer if you have any!

//Louise

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Making your own natural hand sanitizer out of just 3 ingredients, and avoid buying toxic commercial options..png

 

 

The ‘no 2nd hand shop’ guide to sustainable clothing

I am originally from Denmark, but have been living in New Delhi for the past 4 years. Ironically enough I work with development work, and in that connection with one of the biggest clothes recycling areas in Delhi, but can’t for the life of me find a second hand shop (at least not one that isn’t super pricy)! Now, it’s not that there isn’t markets that sell second hand clothing – but it’s usually one of those ‘messy’ markets, where you cant try out the clothes before buying it. There’s also a few websites that sell second hand clothes, but again, there’s no option of trying it before buying it. So, in my attempt to try to be as sustainable as possible when it comes to my clothing, I’ve learned a few ways to go about how to keep my wardrobe sustainable that I would like to share with you.

The Tradesman (Or Women)

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I got tired of my old dress, so traded it for this one.

This trick is my absolute favourite! Since I couldn’t find any second hand shops here in India, I started letting my friends know that if they had any clothes they could no longer fit – or just wanted to clean out their closet (like many girls like to do, so they can fill it up again), I’d love to take a look at it. At first I sometimes paid them for the clothes I took, but with time I simply showed my appreciation by contributing to their life in any way I could – I gave away homemade soaps as gifts, helped out with hair loss remedies and other things I do well. With friends that are interested I exchange clothes – which is pretty useful when I sometimes gain or loose weight. Actually me and my best friend, continuously exchange clothes, and often regain a piece of clothes we couldn’t fit some years back.

I must admit that in the pursuit of getting as much as possible of my clothes second hand, I’m not picky about what I wear – at least style wise. Which is always kind of funny, when people give me compliments on what I wear, because I get to say: “You’re really complimenting my friends taste, not mine”!

Buy Me Once

My father has taught me many things, and one of them is this: buy things of quality, and only buy it once in your life. There are some things I haven’t been able to wait around for one of my friends to have a spare of, in my size and of the quality level I needed. Such as for example hiking boots and a travelling purse. So whenever I have to buy anything new, that I know I will need for many years to come, I try to find high quality brands. A few brands even have life time warranty. It does take some research to find it, and at times a little manoeuvring to get my hands on it. But on the other hand, I only buy it once! The last three things I bought were:

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  • A handbag and shoes from Hide design. The bags are made completely from natural materials, and also run a range with lifetime guarantee. Though, even the ones that don’t will last a long time, if taken proper care of.

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  • Dr Martens for hiking. A bit on the expensive side, but even they are super solid and robust, and again have a range with life time guarantee.

For inspiration on quality purchases you can visit the website: Buy Me Once. If they don’t ship to your country, you can search the same items on amazon or other. Thats what I do!

The Ethical Brand

There are some items, that no matter what I do, wont ever last a lifetime. Items such as underwear, socks, jeans (at least mine) and t-shirts have to be exchanged from time to time. So if I can’t get it second hand, and I know I will have to buy it more than once – I try to buy from Organic and Ethical brands. The biggest downside to this is that the brands I trust are legitimately ethical, are also quite highly priced – but since it only happens rarely, it can also be a welcome treat. In India some examples are No NastiesPeople TreeSoma shop and Anokhi. The online shop Organic Shop (India only) has the biggest collection of different organic/natural brands and items I’ve found.

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A collection from the Indian based No Nasties – organic and ethical clothing

Know Your Fabrics

This is my third go to method of buying more sustainable clothes, if the two first aren’t an option. The trick is simple – go for natural fabrics such as cotton, hemp, silk, wool and bamboo, because they are biodegradable. Even if I buy something second hand, I will still try to go for natural fabrics. Examples of synthetic fabrics are polyester, nylon, acrylic and spandex. There’s a lot of information online, so in doubt I just google it.

Think Global, Act Local

Transport of goods has a very high co2 footprint, because of the use of fuel and energy – as well as possibly use of extensive packaging and other protection needed. So I try as much as I can to buy things produced here in India or neighbouring countries. If possible I try to buy directly from the producer, or NGO’s and other organisations linking villages to markets here in Delhi.

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Keep It Simple

This last trick, has in time become my first – I think many knows the feeling of having a closet full of clothes, and nothing to wear. So I try to keep my closet simply, with clothes that fit (get rid of those jeans you haven’t been able to fit for years) and that I love to wear. Whenever I get tired of wearing the same, I trade it for something new. That was it for now. Feel free to leave a comment with your own experiences, questions or anything really…

//Louise.

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The 'no 2nd hand shop' guide to sustainable clothing

 

The comeback of the indigenous cow (A2 vs. A1 milk)

Disclaimer: this post is not sponsored, but has been written in collaboration between the co-founder of “Meri Gaiya” Rajesh Madan and myself. It is entirely our own personal perception of the matter at hand.

When I came to India, I discovered something about milk that I had never thought about – namely that there’s a big difference between pasteurised, homogenised and raw milk! Furthermore, organic and non-organic milk are two very different things too. Recently my understanding of milk deepened even more, when I found out milk from different breeds, contains different proteins, making them very different as well. So why does it matter if all these are different? From my own personal conclusion, I believe the kind of milk we drink has enormous implications for our health (as well as a number of other aspects – but that discussion is for another time). In this article I will focus on my new discovery, leading me to conclude – that we should all be drinking A2 milk over A1 milk. From here I will let Rajesh Madan explain:

A1 vs. A2

When Keith Woodford published the Groundbreaking Work “Devil in the Milk” in 2007, it put a stirrer in the world’s glass of milk, so to speak.

A professor of Farm Management and Agri Business at Lincoln University in in New Zealand, Woodford presents irrefutable evidence in his book that linked cow’s milk to numerous medical mysteries including diabetes and autism.

In “Devil in the Milk”, Keith Woodford brings together the evidence published in over 100 scientific papers. He examines the population studies that look at the link between consumption of A1 milk and the incidence of heart disease and Type 1 diabetes; he explains the science that underpins the A1/A2 hypothesis; and he examines the research undertaken with animals and humans. The evidence is compelling: WE SHOULD BE SWITCHING TO A2 MILK.

The book in itself is an amazing story of not just about the health issues surrounding A1 milk, but also about how scientific evidence can be molded and withheld by vested interests, and how consumer choices are influenced by the interests of corporate business.

So what exactly is A1 and A2 milk?

Originally, all animal milk was A2, including of course the cow milk. But then, a mutation occurs in the Bovine Population of Northern Europe and Voila! Cows started producing A1 milk.

India’s National Bureau of Animal Genetic Resources (NABGR) had done a study in 2012 where they specified that the A1 and A2 variants differ at amino acid position 67 with Histidine in A1 and Proline in A2 variant. This polymorphism leads to a key change in the secondary structure of expressed β-casein protein. The variant A1 of β-casein has been suggested to be associated as a risk factor for the following diseases: Type 1 diabetes mellitus, coronary heart disease, arteriosclerosis, sudden infant death syndrome and neurological impairment including autistic and schizophrenic changes.

The Indian Village and the Cow

Needless to say, all indigenous breeds of cows in India produce only A2 milk.

The cow in fact had, and perhaps still has a central place in the Indian Rural Economy. The milk was treasured, the dung used as fertiliser to rejuvenate the soil, the dried dung cakes used as a cheap substitute for firewood, the male bullocks put to work in the fields, and then of course it fed the leather industry too. This bond of the farmer with the cow is so strong that the cow has came to be held as sacred in the Hindu way of living.

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This sacredness turned beef consumption into a contentious issue in India. The ancient ayurvedic texts supported eating of beef: “The flesh of the cow is beneficial for those suffering from the loss of flesh due to disorders caused by an excess of vayu, rhinitis, irregular fever, dry cough, fatigue, and also in cases of excessive appetite resulting from hard manual labor.” But over time, beef became a strict no-no in the diet of an Indian, except the lowest of the low classes of Hindus and those from other religions.

The invasion of the Western Cows

To increase the availability of milk for every Indian and also to increase the income of farmers, the Indian Government launched Operation Flood in 1970. The import of alien cow breeds like Jersey or Holstein Friesian was encouraged as they produce more milk.

That started the slow but steady downward slide for India’s 37 indigenous cow breeds. There was a relentless and reckless drive to cross-breed the alien varieties with the indigenous ones.

In 2013, Jay Mazoomdar wrote in Tehelka, an Indian News Publication: India is the world’s largest producer of milk. But in 10 years, we will be forced to start importing it. And the Indian cow will no longer exist.

Today, according to one estimate, only 5% of the total cow population is of pure indigenous breeds. But the good news is that over the last few years, awareness has grown on the harmful effects of A1 milk and efforts have gathered steam to promote and increase the indigenous cow population.

The A2 Ambassadors

Unknown to most, Desi Ghee made from A2 milk is lighter than the ghee from other sources. It can prevent heart blockages, help cure gastric problems and headaches. It also combats Asthma and Insomnia, besides lowering blood cholesterol and recovery of wounds.

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Many ventures like ‘Meri Gaiya’ and ‘The Way We Were’ have come up in India which have taken it upon themselves to increase awareness about all the health benefits of cow ghee made from A2 milk and at the same time promote ethical dairy practices and conservation of indigenous breeds.

We felt passionately about our cause for the consumer’s health, farmers as well as cows. We put together a small capital to start our dairy last year with just 4 Desi A2 Cows. We made sure to feed them only with Organic feed and took care of them like part of our extended family. We now have 28 cows – Rajesh Madan

The fight to reclaim the health, community and environmental benefits of indigenous cow breeds and their milk products has begun in earnest. And in the years to come, it promises to gain momentum and turn things around.

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A big thank you to Rajesh for this inspiring information, and for inspiring others to get back to basics! Your ghee will from now on be a stabile on my kitchen counter. 

//Louise.

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The comeback of the indigenous cow (A2 vs. A1 milk)

How to make two types of soap in one batch

The only downside of making soap at home, is that sometimes there’s just too many new (and expensive) things I want to try out – which is actually why I developed the trick I’m about to explain. In this post I will explain how you can make two or more types of soap in one go, in a way that’s simple enough for anyone with basic soap making skills to do so. If you want to see it live, you can check out my last post: Video tutorial: cold process soap making, where I make two types of soaps in one go. I will use the same soap as an example in this post.

Creating your base recipe – but mixing up the rest

I’m sure a lot of soapers can relate to having a ‘go to’ soap recipe, when it comes to the base oils (carrier oils). There might be smaller variations, but all of us have our favorites. I think this is for good reason, because when something works – why change it? But we still need the excitement of changing it up whenever we make soap, which is where the esthetic and experience of the soap comes into the picture – the shape, smell, look and feel can make two soaps seems completely different even if the base is the same. So to make two types of soap, you simply create a base recipe – but plan out different scents, additives and shapes for the two (or more soaps) you want to make. Here is an example of a two soaps in one:

Base recipe – 1000 grams:
  • 250 grams coconut oil
  • 200 grams olive oil
  • 150 grams mango butter
  • 200 grams canola oil
  • 100 grams castor oil
  • 100 grams sesame oil
  • Lye – 141.77 grams
  • Coconut milk – 425.30 grams
The two batches (separated after trace):

Batch 1 – around 800 grams:

This batch will be poured in a loaf mold in a simple swirl with the following ingredients:

  • 50 ml cedar wood oil
  • 25 ml lemon grass oil
  • Aronia berry powder

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Batch 2 – around 200 grams:

This batch will be poured in small muffin molds, unscented with the following one ingredient for color:

  • Paprika powder

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How to go about it

I’ve divided this part in three steps: Planning, Preparation & Timing. Here we go.

Planning

Once you’ve chosen your base recipe, plan out how the two soaps will be different, in a way you are sure you’ll be able to manage. For example if it’s the first time you try this out, start by only changing one element – such as shape or scent. If you’re more experienced you can plan out changing more elements, and even plan to make two different swirls in your two batches. Though whatever you plan, it’s important that it is completely clear before you make your soap. I usually spend some time visualizing my soap, and then write it down on a piece of paper with all the different components and details of each of the batches.

Preparation

Since you will be working with more components than normal, it’s important to prepare as much as you can before you start. Examples of ways to prepare are:

  • Set out as many bowls as you will be dividing the batter into (for two simple batches, prepare two bowls, for two batches with swirls prepare four bowls etc.)
  • Add the additives in the bowls at the preparation stage. If it’s powders, you can mix a little oil in it to make sure they don’t clump when the batter is added. You can either add the essential oil directly in the bowl at preparation, or put it next to to the bowl in a smaller container, so its ready to be added.
  • If you want to pour the soup in different molds, place them so you’ve got plenty of space to work. The batter might be hardening fast, and you wont have time to move things around when you are in the middle of the process.

Timing:

Anyone that has made soap before, knows it’s all about timing, and even more so when you are trying to make two different soaps in one go. The only thing I really do, is to separate the soap batter into the different bowls, a little before it really thickens (trace) and then use a hand whisk for the last thickening. In this way you gain some time to mix in the different additives before they become too thick. A useful pointer is the following: if one mold is a cavity mold, pour that one first. It’s really hard to scoop into a cavity mold (without spending too much time smoothing it out). On the other hand, if you plan a swirl in one of the soaps, pour that first – once it’s too solid, you wont be able to make certain swirls.

Now, that was all for now. Remember, practice makes perfect. I’ve only done this a few times, but I get better every time. And it really keep things interesting when you got the regular process down.

//Louise

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Video tutorial: cold process soap

This is my first attempt of making a video tutorial, so bear with me if some parts of it are explained too fast or I babble a little. Also, at the time of making the video I had been spending some time in Denmark, so my usual Indian accent is mixed with a Danish accent.

Feel free to ask questions in the comment section if something is not clear from the tutorial. I will leave the recipe below for reference.

Base recipe – 1000 grams:

  • 250 grams coconut oil
  • 200 grams olive oil
  • 150 grams mango butter
  • 200 grams canola oil
  • 100 grams castor oil
  • 100 grams sesame oil

Lye & Coconut milk:

  • Lye – 141.77 grams
  • Coconut milk – 425.30 grams

Additives: 

Batch 1 – 800 grams – scented:

  • 50 ml cedarwood oil
  • 25 ml lemongrass oil
  • Aronia powder

Batch 2 – 200 grams – unscented:

  • Paprika powder

//Louise

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The best hand washing soap (with recipe)

There is a lot of misinformation out there on what it takes to keep your hands clean (and soft) – at least if you ask me. I’m not a professional in neither biology or any other science, so if I ever find sufficient (trustworthy) evidence to prove the contrary I will be the first to admit I was wrong. Though until then, I will insist that the very best thing to wash your hands with is plain old fashioned handmade soap! Actually I intentionally try to avoid any stronger stuff, such as commercial antibacterial soaps like Dettol. If you want to explore this topic further you can start by reading: Dangers of Antibacterial Soap (Dettol) and Commercial vs. Handmade soaps. This post though will focus on my own alternative to products like antibacterial soaps, including the recipe I use, so that you can make your own. If you have never made soap before you can read about the process here: How to make natural soap.

The soap I prefer to wash my hands with (and the star of this post) is pure coconut soap. First of all, using 100% coconut oil makes a rock solid bar of soap, which can withstand the moist environment in many bathrooms. Additionally coconut oil is a strong cleanser, perfect for hand washing. A very common misconception about coconut soap is that it dries out the skin, but there’s a very basic trick to solve this: super fat! Super fat is a soapers term describing leaving some of the oil in the soap, , without being saponified (made into soap). This adds extra moisture to the soap. A normal batch of soap will have a super fat of between 5% and 7%, since more might make the soap too soft, but since coconut oil makes a rock solid bar of soap it can have a super fat up to 30%.

The second secret to great hand soap is essential oils. Essential oils doesn’t only add scent to a soap, but also different properties, depending on the essential oil you use. Tea tree, cinnamon and sweet orange essential oil, amongst others have antibacterial properties, making them great ingridients for hand soap. In this soap I’ve added lemongrass and sweet essential oil – which also smells divine.

My mold is 900 grams, so this is the recipe I’ve used:

  • 900 grams of coconut oil
  • 342 grams of Water
  • 140 grams sodium hydroxide
  • 40 ml Lemon grass essential oil (optional)
  • 50 ml Sweet orange essential oil (optional)
  • 1 spoon Aloe vera gel (optional) – added in the lye

Super fat is at 15%

The last three ingredients are optional and can be exchanged or completely left out. I prefer to keep the essential oils at 10 ml per 100 grams of base oils (carrier oils), but many use less than that. If you want to make less or more than this recipe, simply run it through your preferred soap calculator,

//Louise

How to make Stone Age Bread (gluten free)

I’m currently spending some time at my best friends place, and she is an incredible cook. So when we bought some ‘Stone Age’ bread’ mix, she instantly said she could give me a better recipe than the premix. And then she did!

Stone Age bread is a made entirely up of seeds, nuts, eggs and oil. This combination makes it both gluten free and lactose free – as well as full of proteins, fibers and healthy oils (from the seeds and nuts). Another thing I love about it is how filling it is! Now lets get to the recipe and process.

Creating the recipe

Another great aspect of Stone Age bread is that you can customize it according to your own liking, and availability of different ingredients. The base ingredients remains the same – eggs, oil and salt – but the rest can be mixed however you want. Only rule is that the flexible ingredients needs to make up 600 grams all in all.

So just to make it completely clear – you create the recipe by choosing your flexible ingredients, as well as optional ingredients – while the base ingredients remains the same. The ingredients are:

Base ingredients: 

  • 5 eggs
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1 dl oil (canola, sunflower, coconut, olive or other)

Flexible ingredients: 

1. Seeds: 350-400 grams

  • Sesame seeds
  • Flax seeds
  • Chia seeds
  • Pumpkin seeds
  • Sunflower seeds

2. Nuts: 150-200 grams

  • Almonds
  • Wallnuts
  • Hazelnuts
  • Pecan nuts
  • Cashew nuts
  • Macadamia nuts

Optional ingredients (added by eye measure):

  • Dried berries (cranberries, goji berries, dates etc)
  • Spices (salt, chilly flakes, garlic etc.)
  • Herbs (thyme, rosemary etc.)

How to make it

  1. Measure out your seeds and nuts and collect it in a bowl
  2. Add the egg, salt and oil and mix thoroughly
  3. Add any other optional ingredients and mix
  4. Fill the batter into a greased bread form
  5. Bake in preheated oven at 160 degrees for 1 hour
  6. Take the bread out of the form when it has cooled down

The bread will last for a week in the fridge. You can also cut it out and freeze it, and then toast the individual pieces before serving. Its delicious with cheese and different speeds. I had it this morning with some danish blue cheese and avocado. Yum!

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That was it for now. Feel free to leave a comment –

//Louise

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How to form a liquid soap recipe (with recipes)

When I started making natural liquid soap, I realized that there’s a lot less information on this process, than there is on solid soap making (both cold and hot process). This goes especially for info on how to combine oils in the right percentages to make a great liquid soap recipe. After a lot of searching and experimenting, I’ve gotten a basic idea on the things to consider when forming a liquid soap recipe. I would like to share what I’ve learned with you in this post, including a few examples of recipes I’ve used. If you have never made liquid soap or would like to give it try, you can start out by reading: How to make natural liquid soap.

In the post How to form a soap recipe, I explain the process of forming a recipe for solid soap, and there are a few things that are very different when forming a liquid soap recipe.

1. Liquid soap can contain high amounts of soft oils

Solid soap is all about making the bar hard and long-lasting. This means that a lot of oils can’t be used in high quantities, because they make a soft and sticky bar of soap. These are called soft oils – meaning that they are fluid at all times (coconut, palm, and mango butter are examples of hard oils because they turn solid at certain temperatures). Liquid soap formulas, on the other hand, can easily contain high amounts of soft oils since you don’t have to worry about the soap turning soft. Examples of soft oils are Sunflower, Sweet almond, Avocado, Safflower, Castor, and Canola oil.

2. Liquid soap needs high amounts of coconut oil

Coconut oil is a must in most soap formulations because it gives great cleansing properties and abundant lather. Though in solid soap, coconut oil isn’t used above 30 percent, because it makes the soap drying (unless it’s super fatted properly. Read: 3 Coconut Soaps – for hair, body and clothes). Liquid soap, on the other hand, needs high amounts of coconut oil, to give proper lather and is often used between 60-90% of the total soap formulation. I’ve not experienced it to make the soap drying, properly because of the added water.

3. Liquid soap isn’t superfatted 

To Superfat a soap is to leave some of the oil ‘unsaponified’ in the soap, but since liquid soap has added water, the excess oil would just float on the top of the final soap. This means that it’s pointless superfatting liquid soap, the same way you would in solid. Though there are two ways to do it, which is to add glycerin or sulfated castor oil, which are both water soluble.

4. Liquid soap gets cloudy if certain oils are used 

This is of absolutely no importance to me personally, but for many soapers, it’s important to keep the liquid soap completely clear (not cloudy). Some oils make liquid soap cloudy because they contain high amounts of ‘unsaponifiables’ (oil that can’t be made into soap), and is therefore left as oil in the final soap, that creates cloudy masses. Examples of these are palm oil, lard, tallow and all types of Butters (cocoa, mango, Shea etc.). It’s recommended only to add these at 5% of the total recipe if you want to keep the Soap clear.

Another way this is ensured is to make the soap with higher amounts of potassium hydroxide and then neutralizing the soap at the end. This won’t work though if there are too much ‘unsaponifiables’ in the recipe, so either way first rule is key.

How to formulate a recipe

To make this guide more simple, I will write down a general guide and then mention the exceptions in the section with recipes. According to me, there are three parts to a great soap recipe, with the option of excluding the third category. These are:

1. Coconut oil – 60% to 90% of the recipe 

Coconut oil is a must, in any amount from 60% to 90%. I’ve tried all the ranges, and from what I can feel, the biggest change is how abundant the lather is. Though I would say the more sensitive your skin is, or if you want to make soap for children, the smaller amounts of coconut oil should be used. Baby soap is the only time I would add less than 50% coconut oil – and accept the soap will just lather less.

2. Soft oils – 10% to 40% of the recipe 

Soft oils serve to add moisture to your soap, and also to keep the price down. What’s great about liquid soap recipes, is that a lot of really cheap oil makes for great components in high quantities. These are for example sunflower, canola, safflower and castor oil. Other examples are sweet almond oil, avocado oil, and apricot kernel. Olive oil isn’t technically a soft oil but is also a very moisturizing oil. Therefore it can also be added to the recipe as a soft oil.

3. Hard oils – 5% of the recipe 

Hard oils can add some extra body to your soap but needs to be added in less than 5% if you prefer an unclouded soap. Though, since I don’t care I’ve added up to 15% and loved the outcome. Examples are cocoa butter, shea butter, mango butter, and kokum butter. Personally, I don’t use palm oil, because of its environmental concerns but I’ve heard it’s great for liquid soap. Additionally are tallow and lard, which I also don’t use.

These three in combination will make a great recipe. Let’s take some examples.

Liquid soap recipes

1. The super lathering one 

  • 90% Coconut oil
  • 10% Castor oil

2. The cheap one 

  • 60% Coconut oil
  • 10% Castor oil
  • 30% Sunflower or Safflower oil

3. The Luxurious one 

  • 60% coconut oil
  • 10% castor
  • 25% sweet almond or avocado oil
  • 5% mango, kokum or shea Butter

Now to the exceptions:

3. The baby soap 

  • 100% olive oil

4. The cleaning soap (for a sparkling house or super clean laundry)

  • 100% coconut oil

I’m a bit apprehensive writing a baby soap recipe containing coconut oil since I don’t have much experience with it. But from what I can deduct it could work with small amounts of coconut oil and high amounts of soft oil – if you want to avoid using olive oil.

This was all I could cook up for now. I’m not nearly as experienced in liquid soap as I am in cold process soap making, so feel free to write in the comment section if you disagree with something or have other input – I’d love to hear it!

//Louise

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Breakfast waffles (gluten free & optionally dairy free)

The other day I found an old fashioned waffle iron in a second hand shop, and absolutely just had to have it! One thing I love about Denmark is the well organized, high quality but still cheap, second hand shops to be found in almost any town.

I’ve never really taken any sides in the ‘is gluten bad for you’ conversation, but I do acknowledge that a lot of gluten products are high in fast carbohydrates and starch – which can be unhealthy if eaten in excess. For that reason I’m always experimenting with gluten alternatives in my baking and cooking, and of course I wanted to try this out with my waffles as well. I also made them dairy free, since a family member is intolerant, but they will turn out just as great with milk. In case you don’t have a waffle iron, this can be made as pancakes as well. I made them with some creme fraise mixed with honey and vanilla powder, topped with blue berries.

Ingredients (4 waffles): 

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  • 4 dl oats
  • 4 eggs
  • 4 dl rice milk, almond milk, soya milk or regular milk
  • 1 banana (optional)
  • 1 tsp vanilla powder (optional)

How to make it: 

  1. Mix all the ingredients in a mixer or blender and blend till smooth
  2. Heat the waffle iron or pan on the stove
  3. Grease the iron with butter and let melt
  4. Make your waffles, greasing the waffle iron according to need (if using an old waffle iron you will need to turn it manually)

Since the waffles look like little hearts, they could make a pretty cute birthday breakfast or just as a Sunday surprise for a loved one. They can also be served with ice cream or whipped cream to make it more of a dessert, or even be made into food waffles – with some spices and herbs, but thats a project for next time.

Here’s the final result – and with that, I will end this post. Feel free to leave a comment or question below.

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//Louise

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5 ways to use oil (for health & beauty)

I have a closet full oils at home, and truth be told, I regularly have to buy more of them. I think one of the first things I discovered when I came to India, was that almost all women used oil in their hair – which was not something I had never seen before – but non the less something we didn’t do much in Denmark. Since most women I see here have shiny, beautiful, long, lustrous hair I figured it was worth a try, and I’ve never regretted trying it out! With time I found a number of other uses for oil, and I’d like to share a few of them with you in this post.

1. Oil pulling

Oil pulling has been practiced in a number of indigenous cultures, including in India, for centuries. Oil pulling is the practice of keeping oil in your mouth for 15-20 min., allowing the oil to ‘pull’ out toxins from the gums and thereby leaving them and your body healthier. I was never one to get too much into the science of such methods, but in general go with my gut feeling on whether it sounds credible or not. I have a lot of faith in practices that have survived generations, but make sure to keep a balance according to the seriousness of the situation. Meaning I uses natural methods to prevent illness, but never take the chance if I get seriously ill.

What oil pulling can have an effect on is:

  • Whitening the teeth
  • Preventing bad breath
  • Reducing tooth decay and improving health of gums
  • Detoxifying the body and reducing inflammation
  • Relieving headaches and hangovers
  • Clearing sinuses
  • Improving sleep
  • Clearing troubled skin such as acne and eczema
  • Improving hormonal balance

How to ‘oil pull’

  1. Choose an oil – I use whatever is handy, and taste all right. I have used coconut oil, sesame oil, sunflower oil, safflower oil and olive oil. Coconut oil, with it’s antibacterial properties and pleasant taste, is a clear favorite.
  2. Take a spoon full of oil, and put it in your mouth. Preferably on an empty stomach. Try to fit it into a routine, such as when you are preparing breakfast. You might feel uncomfortable at first keeping the oil in your mouth, but give it some minutes to see if it settles in. You can take small amounts the first couple of times to get used to it.
  3. Keep it in your mouth, swirling it around occasionally, for 10 to 15 min.
  4. Spit the oil out in the sink. Don’t swallow it.
  5. Brush your teeth like you normally would.

Voila, easy peasy! It’s good to make it a routine over a longer period of time. I believe nothing will fix anything if only done once or twice. Give it a try over a couple of weeks, and see for yourself if you feel any differences.

2. The oil cleansing method

Unlike ‘oil pulling’, this method might give you more visible results faster. This is a method to clean your skin, using only oil, warm water and a wash cloth. Over the last years I’ve had a lot of issues with blemishes and irritated skin, and this method has really helped calm my skin when it was particularly inflamed. I’ve used a number of different oils, and haven’t seen a major difference in result, so I usually just use what I have at hand. Some possible choices are: almond oil, flax seed oil, olive oil and coconut oil.

How to use the oil cleansing method

  1. Apply oil on your face in a generous amount
  2. Either let the hot tap run until the water is really hot or keep a pot of hot water aside before starting
  3. Soak your wash cloth in the hot water. It’s a little tricky to get the water hot enough to steam, but not so hot you burn your fingers, but practice makes perfect
  4. Place the steaming wash cloth over your face
  5. Repeat once or twice

The steam in combination with the oil, cleans out the pores, and leaves your skin moist at the same time. I usually don’t need to use a moisturizer after I use this method, since some of the oil is left on the skin.

3. Face & Body oil

There was a time when I used to make body butters to use on my skin, and I still occasionally do so, but I generally just use oil straight on my skin now. If you want to try making body butter, you can read how to here: Whipped Body Butter (with 2 to 4 ingredients). Well, there isn’t much of a trick in using oil on your skin, except for the fact that you can. I think many, including my former self, have a feeling that oil will make your skin oily and maybe even cause it to break out. Though in my experience, once your skin gets used to it, the oils soaks in within a minute and leaves the skin soft and moist. I try to use oils that are more light in texture such as sweet almond oil, flax seed oil and avocado oil, especially on sweaty summer days. In winters I sometimes use heavier oils, such as neem oil and a bit of castor oil, which are both much thicker in texture. To choose an oil that suits your skin, you can research the different properties of oils you have at hand, or just experiment. Personally I use oil after my morning shower and after cleaning my face in the evening.

4. Natural hair conditioner

A few years back I started questioning whether commercial products, was really as healthy as most of them claimed to be. Once I started reading up on the labels, and decoding the many ingredients that goes into for example shampoo or conditioner, I concluded that most of the same was if not unhealthy then at least unnecessary. I figured that had to be a simpler and more natural way to clean my body. When it came to conditioner, I turned to a traditionally practice of India, namely the one of ‘oiling’ hair. Oiling hair is as simple as it sounds, to apply oil to the scalp and hair before washing it, to make it soft and manageable. For me it has worked like a charm, and is also a very enjoyable tradition I share with some of my indian friends. To read more on how to oil you hair you can read: How to oil your hair (natural conditioner).

5. Toothpaste

When I started out making my own products, toothpaste was of course one of the products I got around to making. At first I was a bit doubtful on whether natural ingredients would be able to clean my teeth as well as a commercial toothpaste, but three years later and still no cavities, I’m not in doubt anymore. The first natural toothpaste I made was oil based, but I have later gone over to using tooth powder – which you can read about here: Trashy Toothbrushes. Though I wanted to include the oil based version in this post, in case some might prefer it over the tooth powder.

Ingredients:

  • 2 tsp coconut oil
  • 1 tsp baking soda
  • 10-20 drops of peppermint or spearmint essential oil (optional)

How to make it:

  • Depending on where you are, and the temperature there, your coconut oil might be fluid or solid. If needed, put the coconut oil in a water bath to melt it
  • Put the two tsp coconut oil in the container you want to store your toothpaste
  • Mix baking soda in and stir
  • Drop the essential oils in, and taste to determine how much you want to add

How to use it:

  • If the paste is too solid, you can keep under hot water for 30 sec, and if it’s too fluid you can put in the freezer for a little while. Mostly I don’t fuss, and have just used it as it was
  • Dip your toothbrush to add a little and brush as you normally would

That was it for now. Hope it gave you some inspiration! This is just a fraction of how many different uses oil has, with tons of info online just waiting to be discovered.

//Louise

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