Melt & Pour Soap – Layering Matcha & Coffee Grounds

Layered Melt & Pour is super easy to make and it looks beautiful. In this DIY video, I take you through the basic technique of layering using Matcha Powder and Coffee Grounds. You can find the full recipe and instructions below the video.

Use the code CORNER25 for 25% discount on the ingredients linked under the video, as well as all other products from Moksha Lifestyle Products.

Recipe:

  • 200 grams of Stephenson ‘Crystal Goats Milk Soap Base’ (Buy it here)
  • Jasmine Essential Oil (Buy it here)
  • 1 tsp. of Avocado Oil (Buy it here)
  • 1 tsp. of Matcha Powder
  • 1 tsp. of Coffee Ground (Can be used ones as well)

Equipment:

  • Cavity Mould
  • Rubbing Alcohol
  • Double boiler or Microwave
  • 3 bowls
  • 3-5 small spoons to mix the Soap Base and other ingredients
  • A spatula – to scrape out the last of the soap

Instructions:

  1. Measure out 200 grams of Soap Base
  2. Divide the soap base into two separate bowls – depending on how big you want each layer to be

Layer 1:

  1. Add 1 tsp. of Matcha to 1 tsp. Avocado Oil and mix it until it’s a smooth paste
  2. Melt the 1st part of the Soap Base
  3. Mix the melted Soap Base with the Matcha Paste and mix it
  4. Add 10-20 drops of Jasmine Essential Oil
  5. Pour the Matcha Soap into two spaces in a cavity mold
  6. Spray the surface with Rubbing Alcohol

Layer 2:

  1. Melt the rest of the Soap Base
  2. Mix in 1 tsp. of Coffee Grounds to the melted Soap
  3. Add 10-20 drops of Jasmine Essential Oil
  4. Spray the Matcha soap with rubbing alcohol
  5. Pour it on top of the Matcha Soap in the cavity mold
  6. Spray with rubbing alcohol

Set it aside until it’s completely hardened. Unmould and enjoy!

Feel free to leave a comment below. Would love to hear from you if you try this out, or have a question. Until then, happy soaping!

//Louise

 

Melt & Pour Soap – Christmas Gifts for Him & Her (Video Tutorial)

Want to try out making your own handmade soaps for this years Christmas gifting? Click here to watch the full video. Use the code CORNER25 and get 25% discount at Moksha Lifestyle Products, to shop the ingredients. Moksha is a leading wholesale supplier of 100% Pure, Therapeutic Grade Essential Oils and other materials around the world. You can find the recipe below the video. Happy Soaping!

Recipe:

  • 200 grams of Stephenson Crystal WST Opaque White Soap Base (buy it here – Available in India only – this can be substituted for another Melt & Pour Base)
  • 2 teaspoons of French Pink Clay (Buy it here)
  • 2 teaspoons of French Green Clay (Buy it here)
  • 2 teaspoons of Castor Oil (Buy it here)
  • 20 drops Lavender Essential Oil (Buy it here)
  • 10 drops Peppermint Essential Oil (Buy it here)
  • 10 drops Grapefruit Essential Oil (Buy it here)

How to go about it:

  1. Add the French Pink Clay to one bowl, and the French Green Clay to another
  2. Add 1-2 teaspoons of Castor Oil to each bowl
  3. Mix thoroughly – this will make it easier to mix it with the soap base later
  4. Add 20 drops of French Lavender Essential oil to the French Pink Clay
  5. Add 10 drops of Peppermint Essential Oil and Grapefruit Essential Oil to the French Green Clay
  6. Melt your Soap Base in a microwave or double boiler
  7. Add the melted soap base evenly to your two bowls
  8. Mix well with two separate teaspoons
  9. Pour each bowl into a cavity soap mold, that fits 100 grams in each cavity
  10. Spray with rubbing alcohol to burst any surface bubbles
  11. Set aside until completely hardened
  12. Un-mould and enjoy your beautiful soaps!

Feel free to leave a comment below if you try this out or have any questions!

//Louise

 

 

New DIY video series on handmade products! (with discount code)

I am happy to announce my new project with Moksha Lifestyle Products, showcasing in a video series, how to make your own personal care products with bases from Stephenson Personal Care. We are shooting this project off with three videos, that will be followed by one new per week. 
Melt and Pour soap is a great way to get started making your own personal care products. Stephenson Personal Care provides high-quality bases, made from almost entirely natural products. Combined with Moksha’s variety of natural and organic ingredients, you are all set to make your own safe and luxurious products!
 
Use the code CORNER25 to get 25% discount at Moksha, to get started making your own beauty products.

To shop visit:

Video 1: Melt and Pour Soaps – The Basics

Watch how to make it here!

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This video runs through the basics of making Melt and Pour Soap, through the making these lovely French Lavender Soaps.

The recipe used in the video: 

  • 1 kg Stephenson ‘Crystal WST Opaque White Soap Base’
  • 20 ml. French Lavender Essential Oil from Moksha
  • (Optional) Lavender flowers

Video 2 – Melt and Pour Soap – The Microwave Method

Watch how to make it here!

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The video takes you through using the Microwave Method in Melt and Pour Soaps, through the making of these beautiful Peppermint Soaps.

The recipe used in the video: 

  • 300 g. Stephenson ‘Crystal ST Transparent Soap Base’
  • 7,5 ml. Peppermint Essential Oil from Moksha

Video 3: Melt and Pour Soap – Acne Soap with Green Clay

Watch how to make it here!

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The video shows the making of these easy soaps, that helps prevent and fight acne and troubled skin.

The recipe used in the video: 

  • 100 grams ‘Crystal WST Opaque White Soap Base’
  • 10-20 drops of Tea Tree Essential Oil from Moksha
  • 1 teaspoon of French Green Clay

If you love it, share it!

Learn how to make handmade soaps, including a discount code to shop the ingredients.png

Disclaimer: whenever you use the discount, I will get a piece of the pie.

The Ayurvedic Collection (Alternative Soap Ingredients)

The Ayurvedic soap collection is a beautiful creation by my friend and founder of Bare Elements Skincare, Anuradha Pant. I wanted to share this collection and it’s ingredients, for some soap inspiration, that celebrates important ingredients in the ancient Indian system of Ayurveda.

Use the code CORNER25 and get 25% discount at Moksha Lifestyle Products, to shop the ingredients. Moksha is a leading wholesale supplier of 100% Pure, Therapeutic Grade Essential Oils and other materials around the world.

MRIDUL – meaning gentle

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Key ingredient: Basil and Bael

Ingredients: lye, water, goat milk, basil, bael, charcoal powder, coconut oil, palm (RSPO), rice bran, olive oil pomace, shea butter, kokum butter, chlorophyll oleoresin, silk fibers tussah, kaolin clay, Himalayan rock salt, brown unrefined sugar, cedarwood, lime essential oil

SHANTI – meaning peace

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Key ingredient: 100 x washed cow ghee and Wild Turmeric

Ingredients: lye, water, goat milk, 100 x washed cow ghee ( clarified butter), coconut oil, palm (RSPO), rice bran, safflower, olive oil pomace, kokum butter, castor oil, silk fibres tussah, kaolin clay, Himalayan rock salt, brown unrefined sugar, annatto infusion, wild turmeric ( Kasturi Manjal ), cedarwood, ashwagandha, ylang-ylang, pine

CHANDAN – meaning sandalwood

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Key ingredient: Red Sandalwood

Ingredients: lye, water, goat milk, 100 x washed cow ghee (clarified butter), coconut oil, palm (RSPO), rice bran, olive oil pomace, cocoa butter, castor oil, kaolin clay, red sandalwood powder, Himalayan rock salt, brown unrefined sugar, tussah silk fibres, french lavender, peppermint essential oil

KESH – meaning hair

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The key ingredient(s): Brahmi, Amla, Arapu, and Curry leaves

Ingredients: lye, water, coconut oil, safflower, olive oil pomace, shea butter, castor oil, silk fibres tussah, kaolin clay, Himalayan rock salt, brown unrefined sugar, Brahmi powder, amla powder, arupu ( cake oil tree), curry leaves powder, basil, lime, lemon, cedarwood, rosemary essential oils

Hope this will give you some inspiration to explore Indian ingredients for your next soap making session. Feel free to leave a comment below with any thoughts or questions!

//Louise

How to Make Liquid Soap, the Easy Way!

If you have never made liquid soap from scratch, and are looking for a natural alternative for commercial options – this might be helpful! To making liquid Soap the easy way you just need a piece of natural soap, water and a pot to boil it in. If you would like to try your hand at making liquid soap from scratch you can start by reading  How to make natural liquid soap. Otherwise, keep reading!

The Method, Issues and Solutions

This method is very simple, and I didn’t invent it. Though there are two differences between how I use this method and the way I’ve mostly found other people do it. Here are the two main issues and the solutions I’ve found to solve them.

Issue 1: some soap turns out sticky, lumpy or uneven when its melted into water.

This can partially be avoided by adding more water, but that takes away from the lather (and obviously makes it very thin)

Solution: I use pure Coconut Soap. 

Every soap, according to its formulation, has a different diluting point (how much water is needed to dilute it). Coconut Soap has one of the lowest diluting points, as well as an abundant lather, meaning that even when it’s diluted with water it still stays relatively thick and with a great lather.

Issue 2: most recipes call for grating the soap.

Have you every grated soap? It takes forever!

Solution: the same solution – I use coconut soap.

Coconut Soap dissolves fast and evenly, without needing any grating. I simply leave the full pieces of soap in the water and let the heat do its job.

What you need

  1. A pot – it doesn’t have to be a double boiler, just any regular cooking pot
  2. A spatula or big spoon 
  3. Pure Coconut Soap – I make it by the cold process method and store it for when I need more liquid soap. You can find a guide here: Two Coconut Soaps – for Beauty and Cleaning. Alternatively, you can buy it!
  4. Water – plain old normal tap water
  5. (Optional) Essential oils – any of your own choice

How to go about it

  1. Measure and weigh your soap and water – approximately 1 CUP of water per 100 grams of soap
  2. Simmer it on low heat – don’t boil it, since it might burn (and burned soap smells horrible!)
  3. Stir occasionally – until the pieces of soap have dissolved completely
  4. Put aside – until it has cooled down
  5. Add Essential Oils – until it has the scent you want

How to store it

Keep in an airtight bottle. I don’t make more than I need for a month, so I don’t need to add any preservatives. In case you keep it for more than a month, I would recommend that you only use it for dish wash, laundry and cleaning around the house.

Note: I use this method for personal use only. If you intend to sell or in any other way distribute, I would recommend you use appropriate preservatives.

What to use it for

Coconut soap is very cleansing and is, therefore, makes great for washing dishes, clothes and cleaning the house. As for beauty, make sure the Coconut Soap is properly superfatted (read the article given above) since it will otherwise be too drying on the skin. I’ve heard very mixed reviews on coconut soap as a face and body bar, but I personally love it!

This was all for now. Let me know if you try it out, or have any other tips to making liquid soap the easy way!

//Louise

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Making soap the easy way, is as easy as vooking a meal. All you need is a solid bar of coconut soap and water!.png

How to make two types of soap in one batch

The only downside of making soap at home, is that sometimes there’s just too many new (and expensive) things I want to try out – which is actually why I developed the trick I’m about to explain. In this post I will explain how you can make two or more types of soap in one go, in a way that’s simple enough for anyone with basic soap making skills to do so. If you want to see it live, you can check out my last post: Video tutorial: cold process soap making, where I make two types of soaps in one go. I will use the same soap as an example in this post.

Creating your base recipe – but mixing up the rest

I’m sure a lot of soapers can relate to having a ‘go to’ soap recipe, when it comes to the base oils (carrier oils). There might be smaller variations, but all of us have our favorites. I think this is for good reason, because when something works – why change it? But we still need the excitement of changing it up whenever we make soap, which is where the esthetic and experience of the soap comes into the picture – the shape, smell, look and feel can make two soaps seems completely different even if the base is the same. So to make two types of soap, you simply create a base recipe – but plan out different scents, additives and shapes for the two (or more soaps) you want to make. Here is an example of a two soaps in one:

Base recipe – 1000 grams:
  • 250 grams coconut oil
  • 200 grams olive oil
  • 150 grams mango butter
  • 200 grams canola oil
  • 100 grams castor oil
  • 100 grams sesame oil
  • Lye – 141.77 grams
  • Coconut milk – 425.30 grams
The two batches (separated after trace):

Batch 1 – around 800 grams:

This batch will be poured in a loaf mold in a simple swirl with the following ingredients:

  • 50 ml cedar wood oil
  • 25 ml lemon grass oil
  • Aronia berry powder

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Batch 2 – around 200 grams:

This batch will be poured in small muffin molds, unscented with the following one ingredient for color:

  • Paprika powder

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How to go about it

I’ve divided this part in three steps: Planning, Preparation & Timing. Here we go.

Planning

Once you’ve chosen your base recipe, plan out how the two soaps will be different, in a way you are sure you’ll be able to manage. For example if it’s the first time you try this out, start by only changing one element – such as shape or scent. If you’re more experienced you can plan out changing more elements, and even plan to make two different swirls in your two batches. Though whatever you plan, it’s important that it is completely clear before you make your soap. I usually spend some time visualizing my soap, and then write it down on a piece of paper with all the different components and details of each of the batches.

Preparation

Since you will be working with more components than normal, it’s important to prepare as much as you can before you start. Examples of ways to prepare are:

  • Set out as many bowls as you will be dividing the batter into (for two simple batches, prepare two bowls, for two batches with swirls prepare four bowls etc.)
  • Add the additives in the bowls at the preparation stage. If it’s powders, you can mix a little oil in it to make sure they don’t clump when the batter is added. You can either add the essential oil directly in the bowl at preparation, or put it next to to the bowl in a smaller container, so its ready to be added.
  • If you want to pour the soup in different molds, place them so you’ve got plenty of space to work. The batter might be hardening fast, and you wont have time to move things around when you are in the middle of the process.

Timing:

Anyone that has made soap before, knows it’s all about timing, and even more so when you are trying to make two different soaps in one go. The only thing I really do, is to separate the soap batter into the different bowls, a little before it really thickens (trace) and then use a hand whisk for the last thickening. In this way you gain some time to mix in the different additives before they become too thick. A useful pointer is the following: if one mold is a cavity mold, pour that one first. It’s really hard to scoop into a cavity mold (without spending too much time smoothing it out). On the other hand, if you plan a swirl in one of the soaps, pour that first – once it’s too solid, you wont be able to make certain swirls.

Now, that was all for now. Remember, practice makes perfect. I’ve only done this a few times, but I get better every time. And it really keep things interesting when you got the regular process down.

//Louise

If you love it, share it!

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Video tutorial: cold process soap

This is my first attempt of making a video tutorial, so bear with me if some parts of it are explained too fast or I babble a little. Also, at the time of making the video I had been spending some time in Denmark, so my usual Indian accent is mixed with a Danish accent.

Feel free to ask questions in the comment section if something is not clear from the tutorial. I will leave the recipe below for reference.

Base recipe – 1000 grams:

  • 250 grams coconut oil
  • 200 grams olive oil
  • 150 grams mango butter
  • 200 grams canola oil
  • 100 grams castor oil
  • 100 grams sesame oil

Lye & Coconut milk:

  • Lye – 141.77 grams
  • Coconut milk – 425.30 grams

Additives: 

Batch 1 – 800 grams – scented:

  • 50 ml cedarwood oil
  • 25 ml lemongrass oil
  • Aronia powder

Batch 2 – 200 grams – unscented:

  • Paprika powder

//Louise

If you love it, share it!

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The best hand washing soap (with recipe)

There is a lot of misinformation out there on what it takes to keep your hands clean (and soft) – at least if you ask me. I’m not a professional in neither biology or any other science, so if I ever find sufficient (trustworthy) evidence to prove the contrary I will be the first to admit I was wrong. Though until then, I will insist that the very best thing to wash your hands with is plain old fashioned handmade soap! Actually I intentionally try to avoid any stronger stuff, such as commercial antibacterial soaps like Dettol. If you want to explore this topic further you can start by reading: Dangers of Antibacterial Soap (Dettol) and Commercial vs. Handmade soaps. This post though will focus on my own alternative to products like antibacterial soaps, including the recipe I use, so that you can make your own. If you have never made soap before you can read about the process here: How to make natural soap.

The soap I prefer to wash my hands with (and the star of this post) is pure coconut soap. First of all, using 100% coconut oil makes a rock solid bar of soap, which can withstand the moist environment in many bathrooms. Additionally coconut oil is a strong cleanser, perfect for hand washing. A very common misconception about coconut soap is that it dries out the skin, but there’s a very basic trick to solve this: super fat! Super fat is a soapers term describing leaving some of the oil in the soap, , without being saponified (made into soap). This adds extra moisture to the soap. A normal batch of soap will have a super fat of between 5% and 7%, since more might make the soap too soft, but since coconut oil makes a rock solid bar of soap it can have a super fat up to 30%.

The second secret to great hand soap is essential oils. Essential oils doesn’t only add scent to a soap, but also different properties, depending on the essential oil you use. Tea tree, cinnamon and sweet orange essential oil, amongst others have antibacterial properties, making them great ingridients for hand soap. In this soap I’ve added lemongrass and sweet essential oil – which also smells divine.

My mold is 900 grams, so this is the recipe I’ve used:

  • 900 grams of coconut oil
  • 342 grams of Water
  • 140 grams sodium hydroxide
  • 40 ml Lemon grass essential oil (optional)
  • 50 ml Sweet orange essential oil (optional)
  • 1 spoon Aloe vera gel (optional) – added in the lye

Super fat is at 15%

The last three ingredients are optional and can be exchanged or completely left out. I prefer to keep the essential oils at 10 ml per 100 grams of base oils (carrier oils), but many use less than that. If you want to make less or more than this recipe, simply run it through your preferred soap calculator,

//Louise

Neem, Ghee and Coconut butter (the last 3 soaps I made)

I’ve reached a point in my soaping adventure, where I always try to add something new to my creations, just to keep things interesting. Honestly, it isn’t that hard to find new things to add to soap or new ways of making it – because the possibilities are really endless. I’ve recently been fascinated with Calendula flower in soap and using atypical oils and fats. I thought it would be fun to make a post with the last three soaps I made, for some inspiration!

Use the code CORNER25 and get 25% discount at Moksha Lifestyle Products, to shop the ingredients. Moksha is a leading wholesale supplier of 100% Pure, Therapeutic Grade Essential Oils and other materials around the world.

If you are not familiar with the soap making process you can start by reading How to make natural soapHow to form a soap recipe & Coloring soap naturally to get started.

Neem soap for troubled skin

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Neem oil is known for it’s the ability to treat and soothe troubled skin, such as acne, eczema and other skin irritations. I’ve had a complicated relationship with Neem oil in soap making because it somehow always seems to go wrong when I use it in over 10% of my total oils. Originally I wanted to use Neem oil in higher quantities because it makes a super hard bar, and is relatively cheap oil. That, besides its amazing properties. I was re-inspired to give it another try, after reading another soaper that used it over 20%. So I gave it a try with Hot process – and voila, it worked. Therefore I conclude Neem soap should be made by Hot process since it’s more unlikely it will go wrong. The soap batter did actually separate (water and oil seemed to separate, which has often happened to me in the mold when making it by Cold Process), but after cooking it for half an hour it became the right consistency. Now, Neem does smell quite strong, so I didn’t even gonna try to make it smell great. I just want to make a soap bar for my troubled skin, for which I added Tea Tree oil – one of the most commonly used essential oils, to help treat acne. The recipe was the following:

  • 27% Coconut oil
  • 27% Olive oil (I had some organic olive from Denmark)
  • 19% Neem
  • 9% Castor oil
  • 9% Sesame oil
  • 9% Mango butter

Alternatively: Exchange sesame and mango butter for olive oil – 

Superfat: 7%

Additives: Calendula water (I boiled dried calendula in water for 20 min, and used it for liquid) and Tea Tree essential oil.

Method: Hot process

Ghee soap for dry and irritated skin

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This really happened by accident, because I didn’t have enough oil to complete my recipe and I was walking around my kitchen and then suddenly realized – Ghee is fat! Ended up loving the soap I made so much that I think I will definitely make it again. In this soap, I also used Calendula infused Coconut oil, which gives a yellow hue to the soap as well as adds soothing and calming properties of Calendula. Ghee is supposed to be a great moisturizer and I’ve heard of women here in India using it directly on the skin.

  • 30% Calendula infused Coconut oil (infused for 3 weeks)
  • 15% Mango butter
  • 10% Castor
  • 10% Sesame
  • 10% Neem
  • 15% Sunflower
  • 10% Ghee

Alternatively: exchange Mango butter, Sesame, and Neem with Olive oil – 35%

Super fat: 7%

Additives: Calendula petals and Essential oils of choice

Method: cold or hot process (this one was Hot Process)

Coconut butter soap to add a little luxury

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I was in Rishikesh over Dussehra (Indian holiday) and found some Coconut butter. Seems it’s really not used much in soap because couldn’t find any soap calculator with the option of coconut butter. After asking on a soap making forum on Facebook, I decided to use the recommendation to put it in place of Cocoa butter. Though if you would like to give it a try,  SAP value for Coconut butter is between 225 to 235, and SAP value for NaOH is 0.164. You can calculate the recipe. To keep the amount of hard oils up, I added 20% Kokum butter, but that could be substituted for Olive oil, or raise the Coconut oil to 37% and superfat 10-15%. Hot Process does give the top a much more messy appearance, but I’ve decided to embrace it.

  • 17% Coconut oil
  • 13% Coconut butter
  • 10% Castor
  • 10% Sesame
  • 15% safflower
  • 15% Sunflower
  • 20% Kokum butter

Superfat: 7%

Additives: Calendula infused water and activated charcoal. Citronella, Bergamot and Sweet Orange essential oil.

Method: cold or hot process

I hope this inspired you for some new soap experiments. Feel free to leave a comment if you have any questions or input.

//Louise

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3 easy DIY projects (for natural beauty products)

I always loved making things myself. I am a passionate soaper, which means I end up writing a lot about it, but I have a lot of additional experience with making other Natural products because I make all my own products. So I thought I would put together a list of easy DIY Natural products that can be made with 2 to 4 ingredients, for own personal use or to gift in the upcoming  Indian holiday season. Lets face it, nothing beats homemade gifts. So here we go.

Lip Balms for super soft lips

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Use lip balm tubes or small containers like this. Makes a very cute gift

Lip balms are some of the easiest products you can make. Again, I’m super lazy when it comes to personal care, so I’ve narrowed it down to the most basic thing I can use on my lips – butter! I just take some Mango butter and use it as lip balm. Though as a gift it’s nice to fancy it up a bit. There’s only one thing you need to keep in mind when making your lip balms:

Some essential oils are phototoxic, which means that they react to exposure to sunlight, in a way that can cause allergic reactions in some people. Phototoxic essential oils are mostly citrus scents such as Lime, Orange, Mandarin, Bergamot and Lemon. So don’t use these in the Lip balms. Actually they should never be added in product used when going outside during the day. Otherwise you can switch up any part of the recipe – Shea butter, Cocoa butter, Sal butter and Mowrah butter can be substituted for the butters, and any Carrier oil or essential oil depending on availability and preference.

Mango Lavender Lip (Vegan):

This makes a softer, more butter like lip balm. Almost like a lip butter. I prefer this because it’s easier to apply in a round container. For a lip balm tube it won’t work because it’s not hard enough. This is also an option for vegans that don’t want any animal products in their products.

  • 50% Mango butter
  • 50% Sweet Almond oil
  • Lavender essential oil

Kokum Coconut Care:

I personally love peppermint in my lip balms. It gives a tingling sensation when you apply it and just smells like a dream. This works well in both a container and a lip balm tube. Beeswax protects the skin and tend to make the lip balm feel fresh on the lips a little longer. This might get a little hard in winters, so its possible to add a little extra oil if you like it softer.

  • 50% Coconut oil
  • 25% Kokum
  • 25% Beeswax
  • Peppermint or Spearmint essential oil
How to make it
  1. Measure out your ingredients on a scale according to the size of your containers
  2. Gather oils/butters/beeswax in a double boiler and melt
  3. Add essential oils (I would add a few drops per 30 grams)
  4. Pour into your containers and let it harden

Face packs for beautiful skin

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You can mix up the ingredients. This is Bentonite and Turmeric.

Face packs or Face masks (depending on where in the world you are) is another thing that is super easy and still feels really really luxurious. I prefer to keep my Face packs pretty simple, and always use clay as my base. Besides being fantastic for the skin, clay also gives the mask a very smooth feel and makes it easy to apply. Depending on your preferences you can use any clay – I’ve chosen Bentonite Clay and Karolin Clay.

Activated charcoal & karolin clay

Activated Charcoal is a fantastic skin cleaner, because it absorbs impurities without drying the skin. Karolin clay is a great clay for more sensitive skin, because its a very gentle cleaner that moisturises. This mask is perfect for dry, sensitive and troubled skin.

  • 75% Karolin Clay
  • 25% Activated Charcoal

Turmeric & Bentonite Clay

This mask is not for sensitive skin. If you want to make it more mild, you can switch Bentonite for Karolin Clay. Though Bentonite Clay is super cleansing, and perfect for skin that needs some extra detoxifying. When coming in contact with liquid the clay gets the ability to absorb toxins and impurities. Turmeric is an ancient Ayuvedic ingredient in Indian skin care, that is used to give a beautiful natural glow and is said to be help lighten dark spots. If you’re very light skinned, it might give a yellow glow for some time after its used. You can removed it by applying oil on your skin, and remove it with a warm washcloth.

  • 85% Bentonite Clay
  • 15% Turmeric

Note: you can add any favourite ingredient to the mix such as for example Red Sandalwood or fruit powders

How to make it:

  1. Measure out your ingredients on a scale according to the size of your containers
  2. Gather, mix and voila!
  3. The mixes can be used mixed with water, honey or rosewater. If you’re gifting it you can make a small instruction to go with it.

Hair pack for lustrous hair

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I’ve not used hair packs much, but when a friend showed me a hair pack she wanted (and I saw the price of it) I told her I could make it for her. After using it once, she declared every dying love to it and made me promise to order the ingredients for it right away. So for so much love I thought that should make the list. Now hair packs can be combined in any combinations of the ingredients I list, so feel free to get creative. Actually you can even stuff all of them in one hair pack!

Hair cleanser and softener (south Indian style) 

Soap nut is traditionally used to clean hair in India, and can actually be a substitute for shampoo. If you want to read more on natural shampoo you can read Chāmpo चाँपो / Shampoo. Arappu is made from a leaf and is mostly used in southern India to clean and soften hair. It’s a natural conditioner, so it will leave your hair super soft.

  • 25 % Reetha (soap nut) powder
  • 75 % Arappu powder

Optional adds: Amla for shine

Hair cleanser and shine 

Shikakai like soap nut is also a natural cleaner, and help strengthen the hair roots. Amla nourishes the hair all around, and gives beautiful shine.

  • Amla powder
  • Shikakai powder

Optional adds: Arappu for extra soft hair

Hairfall hair pack

Neem and Fenugreek are superior when it comes to help treat hair fall, while Amla and Moringa nourishes and stimulates hair growth. Even if you’re not struggling with hair fall it’s still a super hair pack that will give overall healthy hair and scalp.

  • Amla powder
  • Moringa powder
  • Neem powder
  • Fenugreek powder

Optional adds: Reetha or Shikakai for Cleanse

How to make it:

  • Measure out your ingredients on a scale according to the size of your containers
  • Gather, mix and voila!
  • The mixes can be used mixed with water or yogurt to be applied on hair. If you’re gifting it you can make a small instruction to go with it.

Other ideas

Another easy idea for a personalised gift is to make body butter. If you want to give it a try you can read Whipped Body Butter (with 2 to 4 ingredients). If you’re more adventurous you can go for learning how to make soap here – How to make natural soap. Though I warn you, soap making is highly addictive. One day you find yourself counting the days since you made your last batch of soap. Sigh, 2 weeks. I hope this was useful! Let me know if you have any questions or ideas for more easy DIY.

//Louise

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Three natural ways you can wash your hair without shampoo or chemicals!.png